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Easy to Make Triangle Stand

Put together 6 sticks to make 4 triangles, and what have you got?
… an Easy To Make Triangle Stand for a photo or drawing! It’s a perfect example of what we learn in school can be used in real life.

Supplies

6 sticks, such as:
6 unsharpened pencils
6 chopsticks
6 twigs, cut to the same length
rubber bands

Instructions

Arrange 3 sticks in a triangular shape with the ends slightly overlapping. Wrap a rubber band several times near each end.

At each intersection, add another stick. (Stretch the rubber band to fit around its end, or use another rubber band to hold it.) Overlap the sticks so they form 3 more triangles. Use another rubber band to secure them.

Your 6 sticks have formed a tetrahedron! Make sure that all 4 triangles are regular (with edges of the same length).

Be sure that at least one stick lies in front of the other sticks, so that it forms a ledge to hold your picture. (Can you arrange your sticks so that 3 of the 6 edges form ledges?)

Place a picture in your triangle stand.

(This card was made by Jasmin Floyd, age 9. Visit her website at www.jasminariel.com to see more of her handmade greeting cards!)

This craft is copyrighted by Wendy Petti of Math Cats and is reprinted with her express permission.

What do you think?

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Contributor

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Math Cats

Wendy Petti is the creator of the award-winning Math Cats website. Wendy began loving math when her 8th grade math teacher showed her class how to make a 20-sided icosahedron from three rows of triangles drawn on a flat sheet of paper. Wendy teaches upper elementary math at Washington International School, where her students love making math crafts. She makes frequent presentations at state, regional, and national math and technology conferences. Wendy is the author of Exploring Math with MicroWorlds EX (LCSI, 2005) and writes a monthly column (Math Cats Math Chat) at educationworld.com.

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